Resources for Lent 2014

Here is a collection of new resources for Lent and a reminder of some good old ones!

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The Lent Project
– Biola University
an online calendar of prayers, liturgies, and music for the entire season of Lent.


The Passover Song
– Caroline Cobb and Sean Carter

Love & Lightning, Winter & Warm cover art
a compendium of hymn retunes and originals.
Hymns & Friends cover art
Wendell Kimbroughhymns & friends
a collection of acoustic/folk arrangements of traditional hymns for worship along with two originals.

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Native Air Band
(Luke Brawner)
Ephesians 2:4-5 (Song for The Verses Project)

Vol. IV cover art
The Gentle Wolves – Vol. IV
Some good lenten retunes here!
More Music
Cardiphonia – Hallel Psalms (Psalms for Holy Week)
Cardiphonia – Good Friday 04.14.06
Holy City Hymns – Not a Word
Redeemer Knoxville – Rise O Buried Lord
New York Hymns – Songs for Lent (Stations of the Cross)
Matt Maher – 40 days
Bruce Benedict – 40 days and 40 nights
Devotional and Educational
We are already well through Lent but here are a few resources to help you remain focused and refreshed.
Read the Church Fathers during Lent. These daily short readings are a great way to gain exposure to the writings of the early Church Fathers.
http://www.churchyear.net/lentfathers.html
Lent – Preparing for Easter – Christ Church Berkelely
http://dl.dropbox.com/u/1309853/Lent-journey-to-easter-CCBerkeley.pdf
George Rouault for Lent – the Miserere Series
http://misererelent.tumblr.com/
The Early History of Lent – Nicholas Russo (PDF)

Church of the Servant New Psalm Contest

Screen Shot 2013-12-15 at 7.35.23 AMExcited to share that Wendell Kimbrough and I have co-won the Church of the Servants (Grand Rapids, MI) New Psalm Contest for our collaboration on Psalm 113 that was featured on the Hallel Psalms album.  The contest is sponsored by and held in memory of Ben Fackler.

*update*
Listen to a performance of this psalm at Church of the Servant from Sunday, Feb 2, 2014.

A huge thanks to COS and Greg Scheer for hosting such a wonderful contest every year.  You can see the past winners HERE. (Our friend Zac Hicks won in 2010 for his version of Psalm 100).

Who is Like the Lord our God? (Psalm 113)
mp3 | chords | leadsheet

Words: Wendell Kimbrough; from Psalm 113, Phil 2, 3;
Music: Bruce Benedict & Wendell Kimbrough.
(c) 2013 Cardiphonia Music

Our Father, He lifts from the ashes
He raises the poor and the lost;
He seats them to dine at his table,
To feast without money or cost.

The lonely he settles in families
The barren, a mother he makes;
O happy the heart of the stranger
Who’s welcomed by this King of Grace.

Chorus:
Who is like the LORD our God,
Whose glory fills the skies,
But humbles himself with the broken to dwell
Who is like our God?

Though equal to God in His glory,
Christ Jesus became like a slave;
He humbled himself in obedience
To Death, and the Cross, and the Grave.

Victorious, he rose to the highest;
In glory, the Savior was raised.
His name above all names exalted;
The heavens and earth sing His praise

O Saints, fix your eyes on the Savior
And count all your righteousness lost
Be found in his love and his favor
And share in his death on the cross

That all of his power in victory,
Imparted to you, may abound
And sharing the suff’rings of Jesus,
You share in his glory and crown


Recorded by Wendell Kimbrough and Ben Hofer
http://www.wendellk.com
http://www.adventdc.org/about/our-staff/
http://www.churchmusicblog.wordpress.com

Psalm 113 – Who is like the Lord our God?

While Naaman and I were working on our own version of Psalm 113 Wendell Kimbrough (Advent – DC) asked if I might contribute some music to a text he was working on from the same psalm. Wendell is one of my favorite new text writers so I didn’t dare say no.  You can read his lyrics (Psalm 113 through the lens of Phil.2) and listen to some music I contributed from the links below.

Psalm 113 – Who is like the Lord our God?
mp3 | chords

lyrics

Our Father, He lifts from the ashes
He raises the poor and the lost;
He seats them to dine at his table,
To feast without money or cost.

The lonely he settles in families
The barren, a mother he makes;
O happy the heart of the stranger
Who’s welcomed by this King of Grace.

Chorus: 
Who is like the LORD our God,
Whose glory fills the skies,
But humbles himself with the broken to dwell
Who is like our God?

Though equal to God in His glory,
Christ Jesus became like a slave;
He humbled himself in obedience
To Death, and the Cross, and the Grave.

Victorious, he rose to the highest;
In glory, the Savior was raised.
His name above all names exalted;
The heavens and earth sing His praise

Chorus:

O Saints, fix your eyes on the Savior
And count all your righteousness lost
Be found in his love and his favor
And share in his death on the cross

That all of his power in victory,
Imparted to you, may abound
And sharing the suff’rings of Jesus,
You share in his glory and crown

—credits—

Words: © 2013 Wendell Kimbrough; from Psalm 113, Phil 2, 3;
Music: Bruce Benedict & Wendell Kimbrough.
www.wendellk.com
Recorded by Wendell Kimbrough and Ben Hofer
www.adventdc.org/about/our-staff/
churchmusicblog.wordpress.com

Psalm 113 O Who is Like the Lord Our God

Hallel Psalms cover art
New composition for Psalm 113 that my friend Naaman Wood and I worked on for the latest Cardiphonia compilation on the Hallel Psalms.  One of many psalms that’s fitting to use for Ascension Sunday coming up.

O Who is like the Lord Our God?(Psalm 113)
mp3 | chart | leadsheet

VERSE 1:
O who is like the Lord our God,
Who sits enthroned on high,
Who turns his gaze on all below,
On all the earth and heav’ns?

He lifts the wretched from the dirt,
The poor from heaps of ash,
To make them sit in princely thrones,
In royal company.

CHORUS
Are You the Christ who is to come?
Or should we still tarry on?

VERSE 3:
O who is He whose lowly birth,
In ill repute and shame,
Assumed the Virgin’s empty womb,
As Joseph’s common son?

VERSE 4:
O who is He whose wretched life,
In poverty and want,
Received the shepherd’s filth and praise,
Within the feeding trough?

CHORUS 

VERSE 5:
O who is He whose words refused,
The reach of Satan’s power;
Who healed the blind and raised the lame,
And banished hellish throngs?

VERSE 6:
O who is He who stopped the feast,
With prayers and broken bread?
“This fractured bread—
my ruptured flesh,
“This wine—my bleeding wounds.”

CHORUS 
Are You the Christ who is to come?
Or should we still tarry on?


(c) Naaman Wood and Bruce Benedict, 2013
Cardiphonia Music, 2013 (Ascap)

More resources for singing the Hallel Psalms (friends edition)

Here are a few more places to go if you are looking to sing through the Hallel Psalms (Psalms 113-118) and our new compilation didn’t have enough options for you!

Greg Scheer
Greg got so excited about our compilation that he wrote a suite of songs for the whole collection.  You can listen and grab sheet music for the compositions HERE.

Evan Mazunik
Evan helps lead music at a couple of churches in the brooklyn area and a few years ago produced “Sunday Songs” writing through the church calendar. One of these was Josiah Conder’s Psalm 113.  Listen/Chart

Taize
A short refrain from the Taize community for Psalm 117 “Laudate Dominum.”  Here is an article from Reformed Worship on how to use Taize in worship. Youtube clips
listen/chart/youtube

Grace Seattle Experimental Orchestra
Phil Peterson has a driving arr. of Watts text to Psalm 117. You can listen and buy HERE.

Nathan Partain
Nathan contributed an original from Psalm 113 to our compilation and also retuned Conder’s Psalm 113 “Hallelujah! Raise O Raise” a few years back.  mp3 | chart

Matt Searles
Matt has an album on the Psalms that you can check out on Bandcamp. He wrote original music and text to Psalm 116. mp3 | chart

Ari the MC
I love this collection of psalms that includes the Hallel Psalms from a Jewish Christian rapper in Cleveland.

Hallel-Finalcover

“Hallel Psalms” is our sixth “flash mob” compilation. This collection of songs meditates on Psalms 113-118 often called the “Egyptian Hallel.” They were traditionally sung during passover, were sung by the disciples at the last supper, and make a fantastic set of texts to guide worship and devotion during Holy Week.

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